Oil filter/coolant hose adapter replacement - TCCoA Forums

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post #1 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-13-2017, 06:54 PM Thread Starter
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Oil filter/coolant hose adapter replacement

Not sure - NOT sure - if it's the issue, but I'm leaking oil from that area. Today, without jacking it up or ramping the car, all I had a chance to do was spray the entire area with O'Reilly's engine degreaser to get a better look at the area. Once it was clean, I turned the engine on and oil did seem to be leaking from that area and not the valve cover.

Symptoms: "Thin" watered down oil spurts out all at once after the engine is started but has rested for a while; usually in the morning.

Questions: Assuming all I need is a casket or adapter, is it a hard fix given the area it is in? It's obvious I'll need to drain the coolant, but will I need to do it with the oil too? Any special tools needed? (Please don't say I'll need to lift the engine)

Thanks for any info or advice, guys.

...Nothing like coming home from Las Vegas to a broken thermostat on the water heater, and now this also. Just the way I want to spend the second week of my vacation. Grrrrrrrr.
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post #2 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-13-2017, 07:14 PM
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Originally Posted by FranklinMint View Post
Not sure - NOT sure - if it's the issue, but I'm leaking oil from that area. Today, without jacking it up or ramping the car, all I had a chance to do was spray the entire area with O'Reilly's engine degreaser to get a better look at the area. Once it was clean, I turned the engine on and oil did seem to be leaking from that area and not the valve cover.

Symptoms: "Thin" watered down oil spurts out all at once after the engine is started but has rested for a while; usually in the morning.

Questions: Assuming all I need is a casket or adapter, is it a hard fix given the area it is in? It's obvious I'll need to drain the coolant, but will I need to do it with the oil too? Any special tools needed? (Please don't say I'll need to lift the engine)

Thanks for any info or advice, guys.

...Nothing like coming home from Las Vegas to a broken thermostat on the water heater, and now this also. Just the way I want to spend the second week of my vacation. Grrrrrrrr.
It's putsy, but not "hard". You jack the side up, remove wheel, remove inner fender, get some extensions and a wobbly socket and three nuts has it out. Once it's off and you clean it up, put a new gasket on and the hard part is threading it up and keeping the gasket on.

I did mine with the motor out of the car, and then it was a piece of cake, but it's doable in the car without too much effort.
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post #3 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-13-2017, 08:42 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Woodman View Post
It's putsy, but not "hard". You jack the side up, remove wheel, remove inner fender, get some extensions and a wobbly socket and three nuts has it out. Once it's off and you clean it up, put a new gasket on and the hard part is threading it up and keeping the gasket on.

I did mine with the motor out of the car, and then it was a piece of cake, but it's doable in the car without too much effort.
Thanks, Woodman. I just took a glance under there and it seems pretty tight with the cross member and sway bar. I did begin to drain the coolant. I left the oil in, but I will change it once I'm through. Tightening that bottom radiator hose to that spout (When I replaced the radiator several months ago) was a bitch to get to from the top if I recall; I never thought I'd have to visit and fight it again. Lucky I had skinny arms.
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post #4 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-13-2017, 09:31 PM
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When I did my Mark VIII, I found it easier to pop off my lower radiator hose. Gives you a bit more room.
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post #5 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-13-2017, 11:52 PM Thread Starter
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Okay, I've been reading old postings here at TCCoA of this very gasket replacement and came across some terms I'm not familiar with, such as a "jubilee clip" and RTV usage. There were also contributions on the oil sender.

Which RTV is recommended, and can anyone provide an image of a jubilee clip to use on the lower radiator hose. How is the sender attached and thereby removed since I can't see its design right now?

Thanks again.

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post #6 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-14-2017, 08:20 AM
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I don't know about the "jubilee clip" but RTV isn't needed for the gasket replacement, unless it's purpose is to make it "stick" to the block while you tighten the bolts.

I would go ahead and drain your oil, you'll have a mess either way, but less oil is better.

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post #7 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-14-2017, 08:27 AM
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Here is an example of a "jubilee clip" hose clamp:

https://www.amazon.com/HOSE-CLAMP-JU.../dp/B008D27R94

What I used instead were these:

https://smile.amazon.com/Breeze-Powe.../dp/B01DKW26QK

Note: DO NOT OVERTIGHTEN!

(I did, am having to replace my radiator since it cracked the fitting perfectly around ... )

RwP
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post #8 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-14-2017, 02:15 PM Thread Starter
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Wow, so there is a hose clamp known as a "jubilee" clamp. I thought is was some type of candy. I did not bother researching it because I thought it was maybe an item with a regional reference to it.

All I've read is that it's not difficult to do, but a pita to work on. I remember the hardship of replacing the lower radiator hose when I put a new radiator in about six months ago, and how I had no room to pull and twist the hose off. Persistence, removing some obstacles like the overflow container and battery, and swearing like a sailor got me through it.

Okay, the tire cross and floor jack await...
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post #9 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-14-2017, 02:17 PM Thread Starter
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I don't know about the "jubilee clip" but RTV isn't needed for the gasket replacement, unless it's purpose is to make it "stick" to the block while you tighten the bolts.

I would go ahead and drain your oil, you'll have a mess either way, but less oil is better.
Yeah, I read where holding the gasket in place can be an issue. We shall see. Thank you for the tip.
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post #10 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-14-2017, 05:59 PM Thread Starter
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Got it off! I didn't realize that one could compress one year's worth of swearing into one afternoon. Took me about three hours to get it off.

Now comes the hard part. Grrrrrrrrr.
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post #11 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-14-2017, 06:24 PM
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Got it off! I didn't realize that one could compress one year's worth of swearing into one afternoon. Took me about three hours to get it off.

Now comes the hard part. Grrrrrrrrr.
Now you're practiced, so it'll go on easier. I'd thread the hardest to reach bolt first, threaded through the gasket of course, then thread the easiest one, then the middle.
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post #12 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-14-2017, 09:15 PM Thread Starter
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Now you're practiced, so it'll go on easier. I'd thread the hardest to reach bolt first, threaded through the gasket of course, then thread the easiest one, then the middle.
Were you watching me? I did just that. It's a bit like a habit I started as a kid when it came to eating my Campbell's Chicken Noodle soup. I drank the soup part first, and then reveled in the noodles last. Hard stuff first is what I say.

Replacing it wasn't as bad (the learning curve and all) as I thought it would be.

I'm off to watch a little NIT basketball, so I'll get back to you guys later. Thanks again for all the tips, guys.
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post #13 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-15-2017, 03:30 AM Thread Starter
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Unless problems develop in the next few days, this looks like a wrap up. Thank you all once again for all the help. I could not muster up the confidence to tackle such projects if it weren't for the expertise in here. ...If it takes bailing wire, duct tape, Bragg's Apple Cider Vinegar, and a shaman on retainer, I am going to keep this T-Bird on the road for as long as I can.

Okay, what did I take from this particular engine project?

* That such a task is friggin' messy, no matter how well I tried to prepare for it. Tide and scrubbing of the driveway scheduled for tomorrow.

* No need to remove the inner rubber tire well as some had suggested.

* That 3/8ths was the way to go with this job. The right size and just strong enough. A 1/4" would be too small/weak for the torquing needed, and 1/2" too big for that tight area.

* That one has got to have patience. The problem was not too difficult to size up, but WOW was it the consummate PITA on many fronts -- I was warned. At times I likened the experience to building a boat in a bottle -- working inside opaque glass, with wet noodles as my handles.

* That just because a tool says 'Snap On' or 'Mac' doesn't mean it won't eventually wear or fail when one needs them the most. I was working with some extensions that I bought at the swap meet once which had clearly seen their best years. Extensions and universal joints (the wet noodle reference) that had lost their tight fit did not mate well with newer sockets and extensions.

* That I need a good set of combination metric wrenches. Such a wrench would have helped address one, maybe two, of the four bolts.


* That's all that comes to mind for now. I hope this issue is behind me now. Thank you all again.



... I do have one question: How does a 'wobble' extension work exactly? I don't believe I have any of those in any of my tool boxes.
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post #14 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-15-2017, 03:49 AM Thread Starter
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This is the type of combo wrench I meant.
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post #15 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-15-2017, 01:04 PM
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A "wobble" extension or socket is halfway between a full on extension/socket and a U joint. It gives a few degrees of movement between the tool and the socket basically. Very handy when your wet noodle is too loose.

Now, remember this for later. When removing the starter, DO THE TOP BOLT FIRST! Don't remove it, just back it out a few rotations, because if you save that one for last (because it's the hardest) it will cause you to curse in languages you don't even know yet. What happens is everyone takes out the bottom one first, then the middle because they're relatively easy to reach, which puts all the weight and tension on that top bolt, making it VERY hard to turn in a very very very tight spot. So, do it first, leave it in but loose, then loosen the other two, go back and pull the top one, then the middle, then hold the starter up and do the easy to reach bottom bolt.

I'm really not looking forward to installing my starter with my headers in the way...

And I hear you on relying on the input of the experts here. I'm nearly finished with my first time engine swap, and I took the old engine all the way apart, and built the new one completely up short of the rotating assembly. Once you get into it, the hardest part is reaching the spot you need to turn the wrench really.

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post #16 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-15-2017, 01:55 PM Thread Starter
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A "wobble" extension or socket is halfway between a full on extension/socket and a U joint. It gives a few degrees of movement between the tool and the socket basically. Very handy when your wet noodle is too loose.

Now, remember this for later. When removing the starter, DO THE TOP BOLT FIRST! Don't remove it, just back it out a few rotations, because if you save that one for last (because it's the hardest) it will cause you to curse in languages you don't even know yet. What happens is everyone takes out the bottom one first, then the middle because they're relatively easy to reach, which puts all the weight and tension on that top bolt, making it VERY hard to turn in a very very very tight spot. So, do it first, leave it in but loose, then loosen the other two, go back and pull the top one, then the middle, then hold the starter up and do the easy to reach bottom bolt.

I'm really not looking forward to installing my starter with my headers in the way...

And I hear you on relying on the input of the experts here. I'm nearly finished with my first time engine swap, and I took the old engine all the way apart, and built the new one completely up short of the rotating assembly. Once you get into it, the hardest part is reaching the spot you need to turn the wrench really.
Ha-ha. Thanks for the tip on the starter. I hope that isn't an omen given it has 145,000 miles on it. I guess I should be thankful this gasket lasted as long as it did.

Great advice, my friend.

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post #17 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-15-2017, 03:52 PM
No, Mr. Lemmywinks, No!!!

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...
Now, remember this for later. When removing the starter, DO THE TOP BOLT FIRST! Don't remove it, just back it out a few rotations, because if you save that one for last (because it's the hardest) it will cause you to curse in languages you don't even know yet. What happens is everyone takes out the bottom one first, then the middle because they're relatively easy to reach, which puts all the weight and tension on that top bolt, making it VERY hard to turn in a very very very tight spot. So, do it first, leave it in but loose, then loosen the other two, go back and pull the top one, then the middle, then hold the starter up and do the easy to reach bottom bolt.

...
I'm happy you mentioned the starter, these two jobs are the hardest you run into, really; the others are just hard labor, lol.

This is exactly the best way to do the starter, and in both cases, getting the top-most bolt started first on reinstall makes the rest a cakewalk; in the case of the oil filter adapter, the gasket hangs perfectly for the other bolts to go right in, there's no need to rtv it in place.

A dab of firm grease holding the bolt into the socket helps; I'm not above gluing a bolt into a socket with rtv (barely, you have to break it loose later) and using that to get things started.

If you glue it right, tightening it pulls it loose from the socket.
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post #18 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-15-2017, 05:47 PM
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Ha-ha. Thanks for the tip on the starter. I hope that isn't an omen given it has 145,000 miles on it. I guess I should be thankful this gasket lasted as long as it did.

Great advice, my friend.
Don't blame me if it goes, blame age. Mine is going bad, and sadly I only pulled the engine, not the engine/transmission, so I have to work my way around the headers.

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post #19 of 19 (permalink) Old 03-15-2017, 05:48 PM
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I'm happy you mentioned the starter, these two jobs are the hardest you run into, really; the others are just hard labor, lol.

This is exactly the best way to do the starter, and in both cases, getting the top-most bolt started first on reinstall makes the rest a cakewalk; in the case of the oil filter adapter, the gasket hangs perfectly for the other bolts to go right in, there's no need to rtv it in place.

A dab of firm grease holding the bolt into the socket helps; I'm not above gluing a bolt into a socket with rtv (barely, you have to break it loose later) and using that to get things started.

If you glue it right, tightening it pulls it loose from the socket.
Three guesses where I learned this method...

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PI Swapped NPI motor with some port work on the heads, PI cams, 80mm MAF, CAI that feeds from fenderwell. Jmod, 3.73:1 TL in Mark VIII carrier, Mark VIII aluminum LCAs, 93 Mark VIII driveshaft, PBR brakes (soon to be Cobras), 18x9 wheels, 255/40/ZR18 Tires, Front and Rear strut/shock bracing, GR-2 shocks, Eibach 1.5" springs, 1989 SC front and rear sway bars.
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